The Sokol space suit: the ultimate onesie!
18 Feb 2019

The Sokol space suit: the ultimate onesie!

The Russian Sokol suit has been fun to draw and adapt for Soyuz Blue! The original Soyuz spacecraft was designed to maintain

18 Feb 2019

The Russian Sokol suit has been fun to draw and adapt for Soyuz Blue!

The original Soyuz spacecraft was designed to maintain a “shirt sleeve” environment where the cosmonauts launched to space and returned without needing space suits. After the disaster of Soyuz 11, when a faulty valve accidently vented the spacecrafts atmosphere into the vacuum of space and killed the unprotected crew, the Russians developed a new kind of “soft rescue suit.” Sokal is fairly comfortable and compact, yet still provides protection to crews during critical phases of their mission — launch, docking and landing.

The suit is one-piece and entered through a “V” shaped opening in the chest. Once the cosmonaut steps into the opening and draws the suit around him or herself, the excess material is gather together and sealed with a rubber band, then the suit is zipped shut. Boots are integrated with the suit, but gloves are removable and attach by aluminum locking rings. The visor can open on hinges mounted near the ears. When the visor is closed it seals with an aluminum flange. When the visor is open the hood, or ‘soft helmet,’ folds away. The classic suit is designed to be worn up to two hours when inflated and 30 hours when deflated.

When I designed the Soyuz Blue moon suits I included an additional layer of distinctive blue radiation shielding. A flight to the Moon takes the cosmonauts beyond the protective layer of Earth’s’ radiation belts, so they may need to wear their suit more often, and for longer periods. The boots are removable so that a cosmonaut can wear the suit up to a week, if needed, with relative comfort. I made my Moon design a little more aggressive looking, inspired by Zuni Indian costumes I saw on display at the Chicago Field Museum.

If you want a first hand look, space tourist Denis Tito’s sokol suit on display at the National Air and Space Museum.

More Russian space trivia included in the hard science fiction thriller Soyuz Blue, on sale now on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. http://bit.ly/soyuzblue

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